Happy Retirement, Bill Giduz!

This week marks the retirement of Bill Giduz (Class of 1974), the roving campus Director of Photography & News Writer. Bill on his bike, trekking around campus in search of the best photos, has been a familiar sight to many Davidsonians throughout the years. Bill’s author biography for the Davidson Journal, written in 2014, describes him this way:

Bill Giduz’s association with Davidson began in 1970 when he enrolled as a freshman. Nine years later he attended his fifth reunion, learned of an opening in the communications department, and has now worked gratefully in that office for 34 years. He commutes on two wheels, juggles on Sunday afternoons and regularly plays basketball with much quicker young men.

He is also a joggler, as chronicled in the Huffington Post in 2015. While Bill is most familiar as the person behind the camera, this week’s blog reflects on his years at Davidson through another lens – pictures of Bill Giduz, rather than by Bill Giduz! Fortunately we have several images of Bill throughout his Davidson career in the archives:

The first image of Bill Giduz comes from the 1970 Wildcat Handbook, the freshman handbook at Davidson.

Just two years later, this is Bill as a sophmore in 1972 – one of the advantages (or disadvantages) of retiring from your alma mater is that there many pictures in the archives to draw upon.

Bill’s senior photo, in the 1974 Quips and Cranks.

Ten year alumni reunion for the Class of 1974, April 1984. Bill is on the far right.

Two images of Bill Giduz from the college’s personnel directory, 1983 – 1990.

Bill with Eugenia Deaton, then Vice President of First Union National Bank in Davidson, on the occasion of her birthday and retirement in 1985.

Rusk Scholars in 1986, pictured with their host families, including Bill and Ellen Giduz. Ellen is currently the manager of the Davidson and Cornelius branches of the Charlotte Mecklenburg Library, and previously worked at Davidson College as a librarian, visiting lecturer, and adjunct professor.

Davidson employees gather around a cake with icing spelling out “Congratulations Davidson, 2,007,481, 41.7%” at a Development retreat in 1986. Bill is seated far right, next to the cake.

The faculty/staff intramural basketball team in 1987. Bill is on the far left.

Undated (circa early 1980s) image of College Communications staff. Bill Giduz is in the front, and Melanie Bookout, John Slater, and Pat Burgess are in the back.

Personnel directory photographs of Bill, 1990 – 1996. A handwritten note on the back of these photos reads “Zoro!” [sic], likely a reference to the 1950s TV series.

College Communications staff in front of the Copeland House in 1990. From left to right: Jerry Stockdale, Bill Giduz, Pat Burgess, Barbara Mayer, Amy Burkesmith, Michele Miller, and Mike Van Hecke.

The most recent personnel directory photograph of Bill Giduz that we have in the archives is this one from 1996 – 1999.

Bill Giduz and Meg Kimmel stand with a student at the Belk Scholarship Awards Ceremony in 2000.

Bill Giduz has been a valued member of the staff of Davidson College for 37 years, and will continue to be a important part of the Davidson community – happy retirement, Bill!

Fresh Burgess Arrived at D. C.

“Fresh” Burgess is Alfred F. Burgess, class of 1928. He arrived at Davidson on September 8, 1924 having already begun writing in his college scrapbook. His scrapbook just came back to Davidson – a wonderful new addition to our collections. Burgess included fewer photographs than some of his classmates but kept his diary longer than most.

Senior entry in Quips and Cranks.

Senior entry in Quips and Cranks.

Alongside his senior photograph, the editors of the yearbook described him as “a brilliant student, a discriminate patron of the fine arts, a staunch friend, and above all, a typical Southern Gentleman.”  It went on to say:

If you want to get a unique conception of a subject, get Al into a conversation. He will intelligently discuss any phase of art with you. Ask him for his opinion of Maugham’s play ‘The Constant Wife;’ Jertiza’s voice; Poiret’s sketches; Menjou’s acting. He will give you an enlightening criticism, and he will make you think!  He is a friend of everyone–his, the most enviable of dispositions. Always, a cheery smile on his face, a cordial handclasp, a sincere pat on the back.

As a testament to his gift of friendship, within a few months he was collecting signatures and jokes.  The scrapbooks of the day came with pages ready for friends to provide names, birthdays, nicknames, ambitions, and happy thoughts.  The space provided for photos was very small — his friends substituted sketches that look not unlike the online avatars used by 21st century students.

One of the signature pages from the scrapbook.

One of the signature pages from the scrapbook.

The signatures are from classmates, girl friends and even the supervisor of dormitories (Mrs. N. T. Smith- 3rd row).  Ambitions included “not to become a preacher, to live and eat, to grow a mustache, to learn to dance, to teach Latin any d___ place, and  to be ‘Prince of Wails.”  Note: Arthur Dean Cromartie ’24 did teach high school from 1924 to 1931 earning his ambition, we don’t know if William Cox ’26 ever got his wailing crowned –or if Melba Johnston accomplished her desire “to come back to Davidson!!”

Half-time show?

Half-time show?

We also don’t know quite what is going on in this photo.  It appears alongside images of a football game and only has the word “Lenoir” written on the back.  The Lenoir High School Band did sometimes play at Davidson games but there are no instruments, just a line of men and boys marching.

A business card from classmate Alvin Sullivan ’36 adds to our documentation of student entrepreneurs. Sullivan used his dorm room (301 West Hall) to sell shoes for the Walk-Over Shoe Company.

Business advertisement for A.N. Sullivan

Business advertisement for A.N. Sullivan

Burgess’ diary runs from September 1924 to August 1925. The June 1925 entries start with a mention of receiving birthday candy from home and a trip into Charlotte for a baseball game  (with a final score of Charlotte 22, Columbia 0) and a Keith’s Vaudeville production.

June 1925 diary portion from scrapbook

June 1925 diary portion from scrapbook

Other entries include:

“Fire” in Hall – Ece and Smittie came up at 11 o’clock. Looked over Davidson. To Hickory this P.M. Date with “Sally Brice” slept in car. To Links for dinner. Date with “Lib” Williams. Dance at “Lib.”  Note: Fire = girls

Start home at midnight. Slept at Gaffney – Home once more tired and sleepy. Catch shut eye all afternoon.

To Greenville and got a suit. People took me up to Paris Mt. on house party. Met bunch of sweet ole girls. Late date with  M. Barr–All up in the air with “Spitfire” Miller.”

Along with meeting girls, Burgess spent June hiking, enjoying big bull sessions, telling jokes, working (he earned $2.25) one Saturday, playing tennis, attending church and Sunday School, going to movies, and playing golf.  The last entry in August has him building a stool for his dorm room at Davidson. Small events but what a wonderful look into the daily life of a young man in Greer, SC.

His alumni file shows that he did live up to his classmates’ high opinion and keeping up his interest in the arts.  He earned a law degree at the University of Virginia and began practicing in 1931. He served as a special Circuit Judge four times and was a Special Hearing Officer for the Department of Justice in 1956. He was active in his community serving on the boards of the Greenville Community Youth Commission, Greenville Children’s Center, Community Concert Association, St. Francis Community Hospital, Shriner’s Hospital, Community Relations Bi-Racial Commission, Little Theatre and the Metropolitan Arts Council among others.  Two of his grandchildren have attended Davidson and now he has added another legacy, sharing the small moments that make up a part of the Davidson experience.

College statistics – 1916 -2016

The spring semester is officially underway.  Students poured back onto campus over the weekend. Following the pattern of the last few years, there are more students on campus in January than in August.  This happens because more students opt to study abroad in the fall.

Coming across the short article below prompted some thoughts about changes in college statistics.

The college no longer uses the category “Electics.”  This term referred to students who came to take classes but never intended to graduate. The contemporary version of this might be auditors –although most people auditing classes now are already college graduates rather than college age students looking to pick up a few credits.  The college does not count auditors in our student totals.

Davidson statistics as published in January 1916.

Davidson statistics as published in January 1916.

In January 1916,  the college still offered a graduate degree. Three students “Post Graduates” counted in the Davidsonian’s summary.  Below are the requirements for earning a M.A. – basically a five course addition to a bachelor’s degree. The college expanded the program requiring a thesis in 1919-1920 and 36 hours of classes.  The option for earning a graduate degree ended in 1930.

Davidson's requirements to earn a Master's Degree.

Davidson’s requirements to earn a Master’s Degree.

Geography is another significant change. In 1916 the college boasted students from 12 states and 3 foreign countries.  The 2015-2016 college Factfile compiled in December 2015, reports students from 48 states and territories and 43 countries. One aspect has not changed– students are considered to be from a foreign country based on their (or their parents’) home address and not by citizenship. The 1916 students listed as being from China include Philip B. Price, George Alexander Hudson, and future college physician James Baker Woods. They all grew up in China as missionary kids.  At least two of the international students were citizens – Francisco Del Rio of Cuba and William Yohannon Sayad of Persia. Interestingly, in 1916 and 2016, the foreign country with the largest representation is China.

The map below dates from 1964 and shows locations of Davidson alumni working outside of the USA.  It was accompanied by a 2-page listing of all the names, job titles and cities. The map included two members of the class of 1962 living in Alaska and one living in Washington, DC. There were no doubt more alumni in DC but only one was Secretary of State at the time.

http://www.davidson.edu/offices/institutional-research/fact-file

Davidson alumni abroad in 1964.

How many more flags would there be today?

The Will Project

That’s the code name we used this summer.  For the first time, the Archives was a part of a Davidson Research Initiative (DRI) project.  The Summer
Research Fellows tackle a wide range of topics spending hours in science labs, working out mathematical models, even traveling abroad.  The Will Project team, students Eleanor Yarboro and Desmond Niegowski and their faculty advisor,  Professor Shireen Campbell, spent their summer hours in the archives and doing oral histories to document the life and times of William Holt Terry, Davidson alumnus, chaplain and Dean of Students.

Will Terry with Nancy Blackwell at commencement 1976

Will Terry with Nancy Blackwell at commencement 1976

Eleanor and Desmond went through dozens of archival boxes and files to get a sense of Davidson’s history and what the campus would have been like when Will Terry was a student in the early 1950s, when he came back as a chaplain, and all the changes during his tenure as Dean of Students, 1971-1994.  They also used their research to prepare questions for interviews with former colleagues.  The result of all their work now appears on the Archives and Special Collections website as part of the Davidson Encyclopedia.

There is a introductory page, a series of essays documenting Will Terry’s life and roles at Davidson, two essays on student life at Davidson, and an interactive timeline for the history of Y Secretaries and Chaplains at Davidson.  The pages aren’t quite finished. We’ll be adding more documentation, including transcripts of some of the interviews.

Below are links to all the research and a few teaser lines to encourage exploration.  We also encourage anyone with Will stories to share them with us – through comments or emails.

William Holt Terry By the Decades:
1950-1959  -At first, however, he had no interest in attending the school. In fact, his mother had to convince him to go and all but packed his bags for him. [3] This young man loved classical music, who loved the beach, the church, dirty jokes, school, and his friends, but had yet to learn to love Davidson.

1960-1969 -Will Terry’s role as a chaplain differed from his time as the Secretary of the Y in several important ways. Firstly, the position of chaplaincy was actually an offshoot of the secretaryship. [3] This position of the secretary had evolved over decades at Davidson, usually filled by recent Davidson graduates; Will himself was secretary when he was only 24 years old. The chaplaincy, however, tended to be held by older men who had already completed their time at seminary and could offer pastoral care.

1970-1979 -The rumblings of conflict in the Davidson College Presbyterian Church over race relations reflects broader tensions about race in the Presbyterian Church United States during the middle decades of the twentieth century

1980-1989 – Rev. Will Terry entered the ‘80s having been affiliated with the college for thirty years. In addition to being the Dean of Students, he also led cooking classes in his home and, following his own four years as chaplain, played a role in vetting and supporting the succession of college chaplains.

1990-1999 -As Davidson College entered the ‘90s, the accumulation of changes over the previous four decades were bearing down on it full-force. Will Terry had adjusted to these changes on a personal and institutional level, but new opportunities and corresponding challenges just kept coming.

2000-2015 -Having settled firmly into retirement, Rev. Will Terry continued to devote his time and energy to the things he loved best. According to general consensus, the majority of that energy went into the Terry Scholarship and Fellowship Program.

Student Life 1950s -In the winter of 1952, a lion cub ran through Davidson’s manicured campus. Sigma Alpha Epsilon ordered their pledges to capture the lion cub. Of the 277 freshmen men, nearly eighty percent pledged, and, of those, 80 percent were the fourteen SAE pledges searching the grounds for a lion cu

 1970s -During the 1970s, Davidson’s biggest student life change was coeducation. The first freshmen class of women entered in the fall of 1972. With the influx of women, there were drastic changes to the campus itself. Prior to coeducation, Davidson had barely any women’s facilities.

Davidson College Chaplaincy Timeline

 

 

The Davidson-R.E.M. Connection

Like many college students in the early to mid 1980s, Davidsonians were fairly obsessed with R.E.M. The weekly campus newspaper, The Davidsonian, featured reviews of every R.E.M. album and local show (see the April 22, 1983September 21, 1984, and September 21, 1987 issues for examples), and during the Spring 1983 semester, R.E.M. played at Davidson twice.

Interview with R.E.M. at Reflections Studio in Charlotte in the February 4, 1983 Davidsondian - a few days prior to the band's first show on campus.

Interview with R.E.M. at Reflections Studio in Charlotte in the February 4, 1983 Davidsonian – a few days prior to the band’s first show on campus.

R.E.M. played in the College’s 900 Room on February 5, 1983, and by all accounts the show was a major campus success – the room was packed to capacity and students had to be turned away. The band was had been in the area for a few weeks, recording their debut studio album Murmur at Charlotte’s Reflection Sound Studios (R.E.M. would return to Reflection the next year, to record their second album, Reckoning).

Ken Pooley (Class of 1985)'s February 14, 1983 Davidsonian article on the 900 Room show: "All things considered, R.E.M. was possibly the best thing to happen since Davidson best Chapel Hill in 1926 to win the state football championship."

Ken Pooley (Class of 1985)’s February 14, 1983 Davidsonian article on the 900 Room show: “All things considered, R.E.M. was possibly the best thing to happen since Davidson best Chapel Hill in 1926 to win the state football championship.”

After the show, Director of the College Union, C. Shaw Smith (Class of 1939, College Union Director 1953 – 1983, and namesake of the C. Shaw Smith 900 Room) received a postcard from the physical embodiment of Davidson’s connection to R.E.M. – Bertis Downs IV, then a recent Davidson College alumnus (Class of 1978) who began giving legal advice and assisting R.E.M. with contracts as a law student at the University of Georgia, after seeing the band’s second-ever show at Athens’ Kaffee Klub in April 1980. Downs’ father, Bertis Downs III, was also a Davidson alumnus (Class of 1953).

Downs to Smith, March 24, 1983: "Enjoyed seeing you last month - hope to again soon."

Downs to Smith, March 1983: “Enjoyed seeing you last month – hope to again soon.” Downs became R.E.M.’s  manager, taking over from previous manager Jefferson Holt in 1996, in addition to providing legal counsel. He is currently in charge of “orchestrat[ing] the afterlife of R.E.M.” (Bloomberg Business, “R.E.M.’s New Business Plan,” November 26, 2014)

After Murmur was released in April 1983 (and reviewed in the April 22 Davidsonian), R.E.M. returned to the Davidson campus, to play a larger venue – the Love Auditorium, in New Chambers, on Friday, May 6th.

The concert promotion in the April 29, 1983 Davidsonian notes that the February R.E.M. concert was so popular that Concert Chairman Jim Hoskins "had to turn students away. I didn't talk to anyone who didn't like it."

The concert promotion in the April 29, 1983 Davidsonian notes that the February R.E.M. concert was so popular that Concert Chairman Jim Hoskins “had to turn students away. I didn’t talk to anyone who didn’t like it.”

The Davidsonian has a long tradition of tongue-in-cheek humor - this special commencement issue of "The David'sStonedAgain" spoofed the recent R.E.M. feature.

The Davidsonian has a long tradition of tongue-in-cheek humor (still demonstrated today by The Yowl) – this special commencement issue of “The David’sStonedAgain” spoofed the prior R.E.M. feature.

In addition to numerous student newspaper references to R.E.M.’s perfomances and albums, the Davidson College Archives & Special Collections hold a copy of the band’s contract for the May 1983 performance. There are several interesting nuggets to pull out of the contract:

A copy of the show contract, signed April 25, 1983. C. Shaw Smith, as the College's representative, signed after repeatedly correcting references to Davidson College as the "employer" - preferred DC nomenclature is that the College was the "presenter" of bands, not the "employer."

A copy of the show contract, signed April 25, 1983. C. Shaw Smith, as the College’s representative, signed after repeatedly correcting references to Davidson College as the “employer” – preferred DC nomenclature is that the College was the “presenter” of bands, not the “employer.”

R.E.M. makes it clear in their contract - it is not an abbreviation or a word.

R.E.M. makes it clear in their contract – it is not an abbreviation or a word.

C. Shaw Smith is fine with the 8 large towels, but wants R.E.M. to know that "Davidson College provides refreshments as a courtesy - but not by contract."

C. Shaw Smith is fine with the 8 large towels, but wants R.E.M. to know that “Davidson College provides refreshments as a courtesy – but not by contract.”

The stage setup for R.E.M.'s  spring 1983 shows.

The stage setup for R.E.M.’s spring 1983 shows.

Unfortunately, R.E.M. didn’t play at Davidson again after the Spring 1983 semester, but we here at Around the D can still be proud of the success alumnus Bertis Downs has found with the band. According to an interview with the Gwinett Daily Post in 2012, Downs’ love of music also fueled his Davidson activities:

At Davidson I had been on the concert committee and had a radio show. I was always interested in music but I was interested more in the business side of music: how does it work? You know, the inner-workings of the business, concerts etc.

Downs also recently wrote a reflection on Davidson College Basketball for the Davidson Journal. Downs remains an employee of R.E.M., and is a retired adjunct professor of entertainment law at the University of Georgia.

Reunions – then and now

Commencement festivities are over and Reunion fun is on the horizon. What better time for an update.  In 2010, Around the D featured Reunion Weekends, noting that the timing for Alumni Weekends had wandered a bit over the years from June to May to April.

The next year, the reunion date changed again — back to June –but not back to overlapping with Commencement.

Reunion/Commencement luncheon in 1947

Reunion/Commencement
luncheon in 1947

Not just the date has changed over the years. Earlier weekends tended to focus on class gatherings and group photographs. Current reunions offer more learning opportunities with faculty offering lectures on a range of topics.

Mini-lectures aren’t entirely new – Alumni here are listening to Ed White.

Mini-lectures aren’t entirely new – Alumni here are listening to Ed White.

Somethings remain constant:

Presidents always get time in front of alumni.

Presidents always get time in front of alumni.

Other traditions have faded:

Group photos are a long-standing tradition. Gathering of class spouses, less so now.

Group photos are a long-standing tradition. Gathering of class spouses, less so now.

and

In the 1970s, the alumni office tried out using hats to distinguish classes.

In the 1970s, the alumni office tried out using hats to distinguish classes.

Food is always important –

Class gatherings have varied from formal to informal - air conditioned and open window affairs.

Class gatherings have varied from formal to informal – air conditioned and open window affairs.

And music is too – we just don’t feature as many tubas.

Music in the 1970s

Music in the 1970s

What’s your favorite reunion memory?  Tradition?

 

An Archives Surprise

Earlier this month, a mysterious parcel appeared in the Archives & Special Collections mailbox.

...

The note that accompanied our mystery parcel, from Hendersonville’s Shelley and Son Books.

The package turned out to be a collection of Davidson-related photographs – a treasure trove of mid-twentieth century group shots, as well as images of the old Chambers Building after the fire that gutted the structure in 1921. Here are a few favorites from our newest photo collection:

We're not sure what the award on the table is, but it's being presented by then College President D. Grier Martin (standing, center) and Professor of Spanish James Young Causey (standing, right).

We’re not sure what the award on the table is, but it’s being presented by then College President D. Grier Martin (standing, center) and Professor of Spanish James Young Causey (standing, right).

Alex Gibbs (Class of 1963) raises money for muscular dystrophy on behalf Phi Delta Theta in the middle of Main Street. Gibbs went on to a long football coaching career, most notably for the Denver Broncos.

Alex Gibbs (Class of 1963) raises money for muscular dystrophy on behalf Phi Delta Theta in the middle of Main Street. Gibbs went on to a long football coaching career, most notably for the Denver Broncos.

Possibly a meeting of Interfraternity Council in 1963 - students we have identified are:

Possibly a meeting of Interfraternity Council in 1963 – clockwise from top row, left (all are Class of 1963, and presidents of their respective fraternities): Gene Wells, Lawrence Kimbrough, Bernard Swope, unknown, Alex Gibbs, Bill Clingman, Jamie Long, John Oehler, Lewis Martin, Bud Robinson, and Steve Butler.

C. Shaw Smith (Class of 1939, and Director of the College Union for 31 years) performs one of his well-known magic tricks. The Smith 900 Room in Alvarez College Union bears his name.

C. Shaw Smith (Class of 1939, and Director of the College Union for 31 years) performs one of his well-known magic tricks, with assistance from an unidentified man. The Smith 900 Room in Alvarez College Union bears Smith’s name.

Another group shot, possibly from a college staff party in 1961.

Another group shot, possibly from a college staff party in 1961. Third from the left, top row is future College President John Wells Kuykendall (Class of 1959, in his role as Assistant Director of Alumni and Public Relations). Also pictured are John R. Horton (to the right of Kuykendall, Class of 1938, Director of Alumni and Public Relations), and Nancy Blackwell (seated, far left – the Blackwell Alumni House is named for Nancy, who worked at Davidson for 54 years).

Dean Rusk (left, Class of 1931) laughs with an unidentified man. Davidson's international studies program is named for Rusk.

Dean Rusk (left, Class of 1931) laughs with an unidentified man. Davidson’s international studies program is named for Rusk.

The fire of November 21, 1921 completely destroyed the original Chambers Building ("Old Chambers"), which had been completed in 1860.

The fire of November 21, 1921 completely destroyed the original Chambers Building (“Old Chambers”), which had been completed in 1860.

Another view of the gutted original Chambers Building. The "Ghost of Old Chambers" can sometimes be seen on particularly dry days.

Another view of the gutted original Chambers Building. The “Ghost of Old Chambers” can sometimes be seen on particularly dry days.

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The columns from Old Chambers remained standing until 1929.

I hope you enjoyed our mysterious photograph delivery as much as we did! If you can help identify any of the people in these images, please contact the College Archives.

October is for Archives-Lovers

October is American Archives Month (and North Carolina Archives Month), and here at Davidson’s Archives & Special Collections, we’ve had a busy few weeks of sharing stories, leading class discussions, promoting archival advocacy, and assisting users! Here’s a few highlights of what public-facing activities each member of our team did this month:

Jan Blodgett, College Archivist and Records Management Coordinator:

Promotional poster from the Charlotte Teachers Institute panel that Jan spoke at.

Promotional poster from the Charlotte Teachers Institute panel that Jan spoke at.

Sharon Byrd, Special Collections Outreach Librarian:

  • Planned Ghosts in the Library event, with assistance from Peer Research Advisors
  • Taught, led discussion, or facilitated: ART 215 Intro to Print Media (Tyler Starr), ENG 240 British Lit to 1800 (Gabriel Ford), LAT 202 Int. Latin (Britta Ager), AFR 101 Africana Studies  (Tracy Hucks)
  • Helped lead an archival donor visit (with Caitlin)
The display Sharon and I set up for a donor visit - we pulled collections and objects to highlight the donors' father (an alumnus), as well as the athletic history of Davidson.

The display Sharon and I set up for a donor visit – we pulled collections and objects to highlight the donors’ father (an alumnus), as well as the athletic history of Davidson.

Caitlin Christian-Lamb, Associate Archivist (me!):

  • Helped lead an archival donor visit (with Sharon)
  • Gave a campus historical tour and set up archival exhibition for Pi Kappa Phi alumni reunion (1962 – 1969 classes)
  • Spoke on a Society of North Carolina Archivists‘ panel for current University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill SILS students
  • Taught three sessions of  DIG 350 History & Future of the Book (Mark Sample), and one session of HIS  382 Science and the Body in East Asia (Saeyoung Park)
  • Helped facilitate and attended THATCamp Piedmont (see the schedule and collaborative Google docs here) after a few months of serving on the planning committee
  • Met with students for MAT 110 Finite Mathematics class about archives data visualization projects (with Jan)
  • Gave a short presentation on digital archival resources at the monthly education and technology gathering on campus (GitPub)
Pi Kappa Phi Epsilon chapter alumni (class of 1962-69) listen to an overview of what's changed on front campus in the last 50 years.

Pi Kappa Phi Epsilon chapter alumni (classes of 1962-69) listen to an overview of what’s changed on front campus in the last 50 years.

We also have a few more upcoming public events. Tonight all three members of Archives & Special Collections will be at Ghosts in the Library – come to the Smith Rare Book Room on the second floor of the library at 8:00 PM to hear scary stories and eat delicious treats. Tomorrow (October 30th), Jan and I will be participating in #AskAnArchivist Day, a national archival outreach initiative – simply tweet a question and #AskAnArchivist to @DavidsonArchive, and we’ll tell you everything we know! Early next month, on November 8th, the first ever Piedmont Triad Home Movie Day/ Personal Digital Archiving Day will be held at Wake Forest University’s library – HMD/PDAD is co-hosted and co-planned by the archives and library staff of Davidson College and Wake Forest University. Come watch college archival footage, share your own home movies, and learn basic digital preservation tips!

Summer Discovery

Decades ago, Fred Hengeveld, registrar from 1921 to 1967, created a wonderful compilation of college statistics from 1837 to 1960.  Well before computer databases, his work involved pulling information from dozens of sources and creating tables on a typewriter. The result was a 115 page book that covered everything from the number of applicants, classroom use and size of classes, annual fees, and faculty statistics to details about students -including intended vocations, number attending medical and graduate schools, geographic origins and church affiliations.

Portion of the pages on student religious affiliation.

Portion of the pages on student religious affiliation.

The chart on page 40, part of the church affiliation data, has long been of interest as it marks the first known Jewish student at Davidson.  Or at least the years the first student attended Davidson. The trick was finding the name. The question has come up a few times but until this summer, the archives staff had not searched the last best place to look — transcript files.

While it no doubt made Hengeveld’s work easier, the fact that all the classes between the 1920s and 1960s were all in one big alphabetical order made our work harder – going by hand through all the files.  In the end, seven names turned up.

Transcript form showing church affiliation for Isadore Doduck - Davidson's first Jewish student

Transcript form showing church affiliation for Isadore Doduck – Davidson’s first Jewish student

The first alphabetically was Isadore Frederick Doduck. He attended Davidson for one year, 1927-1928 and was selected for both the freshman wrestling and tennis teams.

The only yearbook photograph of Doduck is in this uncaptioned team picture.

The only yearbook photograph of Doduck is in this uncaptioned team picture.

He transferred to Chapel Hill and later owned and managed his own printing company.  Oddly enough, he isn’t included in Hengeveld’s list – there is no Jewish student listed for 1927. Although his 1927 transcript lists Jewish, in 1963 he listed his church as Episcopal (non-member) on an alumni form.  It’s not clear if Hengeveld revised his statistics or missed Doduck in his initial counting, leaving the table showing “0” in 1927.

 Doduck shared a quote in another alumni form, saying "After 67 years of a rather wild and wooly, and sometimes erratic world, I still never have lost my idealism.

Doduck shared a quote in another alumni form, saying “After 67 years of a rather wild and wooly, and sometimes erratic world, I still never have lost my idealism.

David Solomon, Jr. is the student marked by the “1” in 1932 and 1933.

Transcript form for David Solomon, class of 1936

Transcript form for David Solomon, class of 1936

He was only 16 when he entered Davidson.  He appears in the college yearbook  as a sophomore who did not have a photograph included and does not appear to have joined any clubs or sports teams during his 2 years here.

List from 1933-34 Quips and Cranks -showing Solomon as a student but without a photo.

List from 1933-34 Quips and Cranks -showing Solomon as a student but without a photo.

Unlike Doduck who remained in contact with Davidson after transferring, Solomon faded from our records after 1934. The only further information come from requests to send his transcript to Harvard’s Law school in 1936 and the Air Corps in 1942.

The other names we found were:

Jules Kimmett, entered in the fall of 1940 as a special student, attended for 1 year

Harold Goldberg, entered in the fall of 1941 and attended only one semester

Harold Herman Frank,  entered in the fall of 1943 and joined the navy in 1944

Herbert A. Kassner, entered in the fall of 1943, appears to have joined the military in 1944

Kurt Weill, entered in the fall of 1943 at age 14, enlisted and served in WWII, transferred to Chapel Hill

The first known Jewish student to attend and graduate from Davidson is Julien Weinberg, class of 1954. He served in the army after graduation, then attended law school.  He practiced law in Manning, SC where he also served as mayor and on the city council.

Julien Weinberg's freshman photograph.

Julien Weinberg’s freshman photograph.

Sixty years after Weinberg’s graduation, the statistics have changed considerably.  It’s been good to be able to have time this summer to uncover a the beginnings of this piece of Davidson history

Rare Book School …and a special announcement!

 I’m just back from a great week in Charlottesville, VA at Rare Book School.  Founded in 1983 at Columbia University, it has been at UVA since 1992.  Not just for librarians, Rare Book School offers week-long classes, primarily in the summer, to those interested in all aspects of Rare Books…classes which are taught by experts in their fields.  Students include librarians, dealers in antiquarian books, book collectors, conservators, teachers, and students (professional or avocational) of the history of books and printing.  Classes are small (usually about 12 students) so students really get to know each other and work closely together for the week.

My course, Developing Collections: Donors, Libraries & Booksellers, was taught by Katherine Reagan, Curator of Rare Books & Manuscripts at Cornell University, Tom Congalton, owner of Between the Covers  Books in Gloucester City, NJ, and Johan Kugelberg, owner and curator of the Boo-Hooray Gallery in NYC.   Rare Book School is one of the best professional opportunities out there, and on top of that is a great deal of fun!

Charles Wright, Senior Photo

Charles Wright, Senior Photo

The week was made even more eventful because of an announcement  which was made on Wednesday of last week…great news for both UVA and for Davidson.  Charles Wright, Davidson class of 1957, and retired UVA professor, was named the United States Poet Laureate.  Prof. Wright was a history major at Davidson, and was a writer then, as editor of the spoof magazine Scripts and Pranks, sports editor of the Quips and Cranks, and on the editorial staff of the Davidsonian.  He won the Vereen Bell prize his senior year for his prose piece Death and these Three. Vereen Bell writing  He didn’t start writing poetry until about two years after he left Davidson, but has since won numerous literary prizes including the Lenore Marshall Poetry Prize for Chickamauga, The National Book Award in Poetry, the National Book Critics Circle Award for Black Zodiac, and the Pulitzer Prize in Poetry.  He has been a contributing writer for the New Yorker and the Paris Review.  He has come back to Davidson to present the Vereen Bell award in 1982 and in 1997.  In 1997, Davidson also honored him with a Doctor of Letters.  Congratulations to Prof. Charles Wright, Poet Laureate!

Presenting the Vereen Bell Award

Presenting the Vereen Bell Award

Chickamauga title page

Chickamauga title page

Scripts and Pranks co-editors

Scripts and Pranks co-editors