Burke’s Weekly for Boys and Girls

Burke's Weekly for Boys and Girls

Burke’s Weekly for Boys and Girls

The library’s 100,000th volume, an addition to the Rare Book Room, was the 1st volume of Burke’s Weekly for Boys and Girls, a short-lived serial (1867-1871) which was published in Macon, Georgia.  Our volume includes the issues for 1867.  It was given to the library by Dr. Leland M. Park, our former library director, who had received the volume from his father.

Burke’s Weekly was begun by two brothers, J. W. Burke (the publisher) and T.A. Burke (the editor) after the U.S. Civil War to provide southern children with a magazine of stories, games, puzzles, and poetry.  The timing of the publication in the South, when many of the region’s families were trying to rebuild from the war and had little money to spare, was not the best, and subscriptions lagged, so much so that the publication ceased in 1871.  The brothers indicated in its last issue that they thought a publication such as theirs was needed and desired, but that they had not succeeded in that enterprise.  They then thanked those who had supported them.

Burke's Weekly Title Page

Burke’s Weekly Title Page

The stories in the issues had plots, which although they were interesting to children, also often included moral lessons.Stories with a moral  Other stories, specifically aimed toward girls, included information on pursuits such as “keeping house” and helping their mothers with the household chores.  The activities of animals and children were often topics for stories, and the poetry was sometimes religious in nature, or had topics related to the seasons.

Poetry

Poetry

Issues also included a section called “Our Chimney Corner” which included riddles, and other puzzles.

Our Chimney Corner

Our Chimney Corner

Thanks to Dr. Park (and his father) for this volume.

Some Things Never Change: Advice for Students

As students graduate and get ready to leave Davidson, they all get plenty of advice.  Whether they’re going on for further formal education, going into their first “real” jobs, or taking a year to volunteer or travel… whatever they decide to do, they all get advice…solicited or not…from parents and other family members, friends, and their “Davidson Family.”  Faculty members who have been important in their lives are often sources of advice, and that hasn’t changed in the last two centuries, as seen in one of our Rare Book Room titles “Youth’s Friendly Monitor, or The affectionate school-master: containing his last pathetick farewell lecture to his young pupils, on their entrance into a busy world, and their diligent pursuit after new employments….”  This 60 page volume, a gift of Dr. William P. Cumming, class of 1921, was published in 1787 and was written by James Burgh (1714-1775), a London schoolmaster.

Burgh’s lecture began:

“The Time being now come, when you are to remove from under my Care and Direction, and to go into other Hands, which will soon send you out into the wide World, where you must struggle for yourself and either sink or swim, according as you are favoured by Providence, and conduct yourself prudently, or otherwise; I think it my Duty to add to the many Advices I have given you from Time to Time…”

 

His advice included the following:

There is nothing of so much Consequence toward gaining a handsome subsistence, and arriving at an early and comfortable Situation in the World, as constant Application to Business, and steady Pursuit of the Main Point.”

“Be on your Guard as to Amusements and Diversions, which, if too much indulged, will take you off your main Pursuits….”

“Do not depend wholly upon your own Judgment; but, in the Choice of a Friend, strive to find one who has the universal Approbation of his Acquaintance, for his Integrity and Discernment.”

He also advised that:

“When you know no Good you can say of a Person, whose Name you hear mentioned, to be quite silent.”

And, he recommends that a scholar continue pursuing

“useful and ornamental Knowledge,” which is “the very Food of the Mind, and except Virture and Piety, is the most truly valuable Acquisition.”

He also reminds students of the importance of philanthropy.

It is a fatal Error, though a common one, …for a Man of Wealth to spend his Riches wholly upon himself….”

 

Good advice in 1787, and still pretty good in 2017!

8th Annual Poetry Reading in the RBR

Tomorrow night, April 20th, at 8:00 we are celebrating National Poetry Month with our 8th annual Poetry Reading in the Rare Book Room of the E.H. Little Library.  Last year was great fun, and we’re looking forward to this year’s event. Davidson students, faculty members, and town poets —talented all—will read from their own works.  There will also be time afterwards for refreshments and chatting with the poets.

Hope to see you there!

Sherlock Holmes: London’s most famous Detective

The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes

The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes

If you’re a sleuth yourself, and/or a fan of detective novels, you’re no doubt familiar with the name of, arguably, London’s most famous detective, Sherlock Holmes.  Holmes is a fictional detective, created by the Scottish author, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.  Doyle, born in Edinburgh, studied in Jesuit schools for ten years, and finished his education by studying medicine at Edinburgh University.  Some of his professors at the University became models for his later literary characters, including Sherlock Holmes.  Although trained as a physician, Doyle was not particularly successful in private practice, and often wrote stories while waiting for his few patients.  He wrote historical novels, essays, poetry, autobiography, and works on spiritualism and the supernatural, but his most successful works were the detective stories featuring Sherlock Holmes and his comrade, Dr. John Watson.  Holmes and Watson solved crimes that even Scotland Yard could not resolve.  Holmes was introduced in 1887 in “A Study in Scarlet,” published in Beeton’s Christmas Annual, and the address of 221B Baker Street became a part of the London landscape, even though it was then a fictional address.   Sherlock Holmes Adventures illus 1The characters of Holmes and Watson were instant successes, and stories of their adventures began to appear in the Strand Magazine.  By 1890 Doyle had left his practice of medicine and concentrated his entire time to writing.  Doyle eventually tired of his character, and killed him in “The Final Problem” published in 1893.  But the public would not accept Holmes’ death, and Doyle resurrected him in 1903.

Numerous Sherlock Holmes clubs, called the Baker Street Irregulars, formed with many famous names on their rosters.  Sherlock Holmes stories have been translated into more than 50 languages, and have been adapted into many genres such as plays, films, television series, and cartoons.Sherlock Holmes Memoirs illus 1

The library’s Rare Book Room houses two first edition volumes of the Sherlock Holmes stories,

The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, published in London in 1892 by George Newnes, and The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes,

The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes

The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes

published by Newnes in 1894.  Both volumes are beautifully illustrated by Sidney Paget.

The Death of Sherlock Holmes

The Death of Sherlock Holmes

Thanks to Mr. Wilbur Fugate, class of 1934, for these wonderful volumes.

Max Beerbohm

The Happy Hypocrite

The Happy Hypocrite

MaxBeerbohm was born on August 24, 1872 in London, and is noted for both his wit and his talent as a caricaturist.
His only art classes were those he took under “Mr. Wilkinson” in the day school he attended between 1881 and 1885. He attended Merton College, Oxford, and there met Oscar Wilde who introduced him to other literary and artistic figures of the time. He was not a great student, and left Oxford in 1894 without getting a degree, but he had by then already made a name for himself as a humorist. One of his pieces of fiction, The Happy Hypocrite is represented in the holdings of the Rare Book Room.

The Happy Hypocrite, by Max Beerbohm. New York: The John Lane Company [1915]. Gift of Dr. H.M. Marvin.

The Happy Hypocrite

The Happy Hypocrite

While at Oxford, “Max” as he signed his drawings, began being known for his caricatures, done in pen or pencil with watercolor tinting. Thirty-six of his drawings were published by the Strand Magazine in 1892. In 1913 The Times called him “the greatest of English comic artists,” and his caricatures were widely published in magazines and exhibited in galleries. Collections of his caricatures are located in the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford; the Tate Collection; The Victoria and Albert Museum; and the University of California. The Rare Book room is fortunate to have some of his volumes of caricatures including:

A Peep into the Past Title Page

A Peep into the Past
Title Page

A Peep into the Past facsimile

A Peep into the Past
facsimile

A Peep into the Past, by Max Beerbohm. [New York: M. Harzof], 1923. Facsimile of the manuscript followed by the printed text. Limited edition of 300 copies printed on Japanese vellum. Gift of Dr. H.M. Marvin.

A Survey, by Max. London: W. Heinemann [1921]. First edition, limited to 275 numbered and signed copies. 51 tipped-in mounted plates of caricatures in half-tone. Our copy is number 4. Gift of Dr. & Mrs. Richard Huddleston.

from A Survey "I do wonder what the young gentleman saw in me!"

from A Survey
“I do wonder what the young gentleman saw in me!”

A Survey

A Survey

Limited edition info and signature

Limited edition info and signature

From Things New and Old

From Things New and Old

Things New and Old Additional print

Things New and Old
Additional print

Things New and Old/ by Max Beerbohm. London: W. Heinemann, 1923. First edition, limited to 380 numbered and signed copies. Our copy is number 226. Gift of Dr. & Mrs. Richard Huddleston.

The Golden Cockerel Press – First Books

Golden Cockerel logoThe Golden Cockerel Press was established in London in 1920. It had three owners during its history, but the most notable was Robert Gibbings, under whose leadership it became known as one of the fine private presses. Beautiful typefaces, handmade paper, woodcuts and engraved illustrations…all are represented in our Golden Cockerel Press editions, and Davidson can thank Dr. Harold Marvin, class of 1914, for donating to us many of the beautiful limited edition volumes he collected. Here are images of the first 9 volumes from the press, printed from 1921-1922, all from our collection.
The Golden Cockerel Press’s first printed volume was A. E. Coppard’s Adam & Eve & Pinch Me.

Adam & Eve. The first book of the GCP

Adam & Eve.
The first book of the GCP

Terpsicore & Other Poems

Terpsicore & Other Poems

Book number two was Terpischore & other poems by H.T. Wade-Gery.

Signs & Wonders

Signs & Wonders

Signs & Wonders, by John Davys Beresford, was book number three.

Number four, another work by A.E. Coppard, was Clorinda Walks in Heaven.

Clorinda Walks in Heaven.

Clorinda Walks in Heaven. Dust Jacket.

Clorinda Walks in Heaven.
Dust Jacket.

Book number five was Kanga Creek, written by Havelock Ellis. Our copy is signed by the author.

Kanga Creek, with author's signature.

Kanga Creek, with author’s signature.

The Puppet Show, title page.

The Puppet Show, title page.

Puppet Show, Golden Cockerel’s book number six, was written by Martin Armstrong. Another A. E. Coppard book was publication number seven, Hips & Haws: Poems.

Hips & Haws, cover.

Hips & Haws, cover.

Hips & Haws, title page.

Hips & Haws, title page.

Another book of poetry, number eight, was Gipsy-night, and other poems, by Richard Arthur Warren.

Gipsy night.

Gipsy night.

Masques & Poems.

Masques & Poems.

And, book number nine, was Masques and Poems by Peter Quennell.

Wilde, Ricketts, and The Sphinx

The Sphinx cover

The Sphinx cover

A collaboration between the writer, Oscar Wilde, and the artist, Charles Ricketts, produced one of the most beautiful volumes in our Rare Book Room collection, The Sphinx, published in 1894.

Oscar Fingal O’Flahertie Wills Wilde was born in Dublin, the son of a surgeon and a poet. Educated at Trinity College, Dublin and Magdalen College, Oxford, his literary career began with poetry he published as an undergraduate. During that time he also developed the dress and mannerisms which were to be associated with him for his entire life…that of a highly affected dandy…which were to be often caricatured. Originally a poet, he became more famous for his fairy tales (The Happy Prince and other Tales), his dramatic works (A Woman of Substance, Lady Windemere’s Fan, and The Importance of Being Ernest), and his only novel, (The Picture of Dorian Gray). His poem The Ballad of Reading Gaol was published in 1898, written after his incarceration in Reading Gaol on criminal offenses. Wilde’s works are known for their literary merit, but much of Wilde’s reputation also relates to his colorful life.

One of Wilde’s friends and collaborators was Charles Ricketts, a British painter, designer, sculptor, writer on art, and an important figure in the Vale Press, one of the finest private presses of the late 19th century. In 1894, their collaboration resulted in the publication of The Sphinx, a remarkable combination of text and design. The poem was written by Wilde, and designed and illustrated by Ricketts. It was published in a limited edition of 200 copies for England, on expensive hand-made paper, and bound in white vellum stamped in gold leaf. The text was printed entirely in capitals in red, brown, and green.

The Sphinx

The Sphinx

The Sphinx

The Sphinx

The Sphinx

The Sphinx

Illustrations used elements from the Celtic (in the first initials), from the Japanese (in the use of undecorated spaces), and of ancient Greek (in the figure drawing). Wilde intended for the book to be a special possession for a few, not for the general public, and was reported to have said “My first idea was to print only three copies; one for myself, one for the British Museum, and one for Heaven. I had some doubt about the British Museum.”

Thanks to Dr. H.M. Marvin, Davidson class of 1914, our Rare Book Room has one of those 200 special and beautiful copies.

The Sphinx

The Sphinx

The Sphinx

The Sphinx

The Sphinx / Oscar Wilde. With decorations by Charles Ricketts. London: E. Matthews and J. Lane, 1894. First Edition. One of 200 copies for Great Britain, printed on hand-made paper. Bound in white, gilt-stamped vellum with Ricketts’ monogram in the lower left-hand corners.

The U.S. Centennial Exhibition

The "Official Catalogue"

The “Official Catalogue”

The Centennial International Exhibition, the 1st official World’s Fair in the United States, was held from May 10 – November 10, 1876 in Philadelphia. Its full title was The International Exhibition of Arts, Manufactures and Products of the Soil and Mine, and it was the brainchild of Professor John L. Campbell, Wabash College (Indiana). In 1866, Campbell, professor of mathematics, natural philosophy, and astronomy, suggested to the mayor of Philadelphia that the 100th anniversary of the signing of the U.S. Declaration of Independence be celebrated there with an exhibition. Although there were several nay-sayers lamenting lack of funding, disinterest from other countries, and an un-favorable reaction to the exhibition being held in the United States, the U.S. Centennial Commission was created by a bill passed on March 3, 1871, and the commission was organized on March 3, 1872.

One of the many ads.

One of the many ads.

450 acres of West Fairmont Park in Philadelphia were set aside for the exposition, and other nations were invited to attend. Temporary hotels were built to accommodate visitors, streetcars and railroads increased their service, and a small hospital was built in the park.
The fair opened on May 10, 1876 and drew thousands of visitors and VIPs to the exhibits from 37 nations in over 250 pavillions. As the title indicated, the exhibition focused on arts, manufacturing, agriculture and mining, and introduced to the world the strength of the United States as an industrial power.

Main exhibition building

Main exhibition building

Although many of the exhibition buildings were constructed as temporary structures, some were designed to be permanent and used after the closing of the exhibition.

Horticultural Hall

Horticultural Hall continued to be used to display plants until it was demolished in 1954 after being badly damaged by Hurricane Hugo. Memorial Hall (the art gallery) was later used as the Pennsylvania Museum of Art.
By the last day, November 10, 1876, a total of 10,164,489 visitors had attended the exhibition. Some of the innovations displayed were the Corliss Steam Engine, Alexander Graham Bell’s telephone, the Remington typographic machine, the electric dynamo, and Heinz Ketchup.
We have in the Rare Book Room a copy of the “official catalogue,” a gift from the estate of Zach Long, Class of 1965. The catalogue included lists of the entrants by country, lists of the exhibits, and numerous period ads, and is considered to be the best source of information on the Centennial Exhibition and its exhibitors.

E.P. Baugh ad

Ad for stouts and ales

Ad for stouts and ales

Ad for a florist

Ad for a florist

Shop at the Great Combination Store for retail dry goods

We wouldn't expect either of these products to be advertised today!

We wouldn’t expect either of these products to be advertised today!

Exhibitors

Exhibitors

8th Annual “Ghosts in the Library”

ghostsNext Tuesday, October 25th at 8:00 we are celebrating Halloween with our 8th Annual “Ghosts in the Library” event in the Rare Book Room of the E.H. Little Library.  We’ll have Davidsonians  telling their favorite ghost stories.  You may not have seen the Rare Book Room in quite this way…with “ghoulies and ghosties and long-leggedy beasties, and things that go bump in the night.”

No tricks.  Just scary stories, and treat bags for all who come.

For some earlier fun, come to the Library Lobby at 6:30 for a printing press demonstration by Prof. Gabe Ford, and the opportunity to print your own chapbook.  Then on to the Rare Book Room for “Ghosts” at 8:00!

Hope to see you there!

BOO!

Chaucer’s Parlement of Foules

Parlement of Foules first page

Parlement of Foules first page

Geoffrey Chaucer wrote Parlement of Foules in around 1381, and it is one of the first references to Valentine’s Day being a special day for lovers.  The text of the poem has been passed down in manuscripts (since Chaucer didn’t have access to a printing press!) and is composed of 699 lines.  It tells of the narrator’s dream of going through a beautiful country where a large flock of birds are debating while three male eagles try to seduce a female bird.  None of the eagles triumphs, and the dream ends with a welcome to the coming spring.  Our copy of Parlement of Foules was printed at the Riverside Press for Houghton Mifflin & Company in 1904 and illustrated by the noted typographer, Bruce Rogers.  Our copy is number 130 of a limited run of 325 copies printed in letter batarde in red and black on handmade paper, and is one of over 20 volumes in our collection from the Riverside Press with type designs by Rogers.  The volume is bound in cream vellum with gilt spine lettering, and is illustrated with large floriated initial letters in blue and gold.

Use of floriated letters

Use of floriated letters

It represents one of Bruce Rogers’ few experiments with a medieval style, and was one of his favorite books.

Our thanks go to Dr. H.M. Marvin, Davidson class of 1914, for giving us this beautiful work.

Last Page

Last Page

Limited edition information with printer's mark

Limited edition information with printer’s mark