Guest Blogger: Emily Privott, “150 Years in the Making: Davidson College’s Mace”

I am a senior Religious Studies major at Davidson College. I am interested in the historical and social components of religious traditions, particularly Christianity, and how religious faith influences one’s worldview.  This summer, I have the pleasure of being a Research Assistant for Archives & Special Collections. I am excited about this opportunity to contribute to “Around the D”!

Last weekend, Davidson College held its 181st Commencement. Featured prominently on the commencement stage, on the right of the speaker, is the Davidson College Mace.

Commencement 2018 showing mace on its stand on the dais with President Quillen

Commencement 2018

Hand-carved by Mr. Jack Ramseur ’31, the Davidson College Mace was presented to the College on January 29, 1988, in honor of the College’s Sesquicentennial Celebration.

Full length Mace in its protective case

Mace in its protective case for archival storage

In medieval times, maces were traditionally weapons of war. Carried by knights or royal bodyguards, maces were used to protect royalty during processions. By the 14th century, maces assumed more ceremonial functions. The ceremonial mace, usually about four feet in length, survives today as a symbol of authority. Carried by the Chief Marshal in the commencement procession, the Davidson College Mace ceremonially marks the beginning of commencement proceedings.

The carving on top of the mace represents the cupola of “Old Chambers,” which was the center of the College’s academic life from the late 1850’s until its destruction by fire in 1921. Below the cupola is the eight-sided base of the dome of the present Chambers building, which was rebuilt in 1931. Forming a circular band just below this base are the words Ne Ultra from the college seal and the words of the college motto Alenda Lux Ubi Orta Libertas (“Let Learning Be Cherished Where Liberty Has Arisen”).

Davidson Mace, showing motto, Ne Ultra

The college seal, designed by Peter Stuart Ney.

Mace showing Alenda Lux and Eumenean Hall

Eumenean (“Eu”) Hall

 

The knop of the mace consists of four wide and four narrow panels. Each wide panel represents symbols of the College, while each narrow panel reflects the College’s historical ties with the Presbyterian Church (USA).

Mace showing Philanthropic Hall

Philanthropic (“Phi”) Hall

Under the “Orta”, there are three Christian symbols with Presbyterian associations: the star of epiphany, the holy spirit descending in the form of a dove and the burning bush. Davidson’s Presbyterian heritage is further reflected in the mace’s carved crosses.

Mace showing the the sesquicentennial logo,

The sesquicentennial logo, designed by James Burkey Belser ’69.

 

9th Annual Poetry Reading

Advertisement for "Poetry Reading in the Library"

The 9th Annual Poetry Reading

On Thursday, April 19, the ninth annual Poetry Reading in honor of National Poetry Month was held in the Fishbowl of the E.H. Little Library. In order to make the event more open than years past, speakers from on and off campus presented in the Fishbowl. Afterward, speakers and listeners alike were treated to refreshments in the Rare Book Room. Thank you to all who visited and especially to our poets: Chanda DuBose, Carlos Miranda ’18, Evan Yi ’18, and Maurice Norman ’20!

Woman stands at podium in orange shirt.

Chanda DuBose

Local poet Chanda DuBose performed her original works entitled “Daughters,” “Honey,” and “Represent.”

Carlos Miranda ’18 read three poems he had written for a class this semester entitled”It Feels Okay,” “Red Toyota, and “In Memoriam.”

Poetry major Evan Yi ’18 performed a collection from his thesis: “No one has asked the house if its haunting is self inflicted,” “Joseph the Carpenter,” “Harold and Kumar go to Best American Poetry,” “Orientalist Manifesto,” “Newborn,” “Lies for my father,” and “Mei Lanfang & the Autophile.”

Man stands at podium in black shirt.

Evan Yi, ’18.

Maurice Norman ’20 is a member of the campus’ spoken word group “Freeword” and performed his poems entitled “Loose Gravel,” “Uncanny,” “Guidebook to Growth,” “The Ugly Dreadlocks,” “Grain,” and “At the housefire.”

Lights, Camera, Davidson! “American Animals” is a Sundance Hit

Advertisement for 4/18/18 screening at Our Town Cinemas.Last Wednesday, Davidson College community members had the unique opportunity to attend a free advanced screening of Bart Layton’s most recent film, the true-crime thriller “American Animals” which was filmed on campus during the spring of 2017!

A man in a parka and winter hat stands behind film cameras.

Director Bart Layton outside of Chambers last March.

While the cast and crew were on campus, students had the opportunity to act as extras and intern on set to learn firsthand how film sets function. A question and answer followed the advanced screening and director Bart Layton explained that Davidson’s Archives & Special Collections had the unique feeling they sought when scouting film locations at colleges and universities and appreciation for student employees who “ask the right questions.” Filming took place outside of Chambers and inside the E.H. Little Library, particularly the Davidsoniana Room and the Rare Book Room.

Look for how familiar campus spots were transformed for film!

The film, starring Evan Peters (“American Horror Story”), Barry Keoghan (“Dunkirk”), Blake Jenner, and Jared Abrahamson is based upon the “Transy book heist.” In 2004,  four students robbed Transylvania University’s special collections of several rare books and were arrested after attempting to auction their stolen goods at Christie’s auction house in New York City.

Film crew set up in front of Chambers.

“American Animals” will not be the first retelling of the tale. Chase Allen II, one of the original four heist members, published the story of the heist as his first public acknowledgment of the crimes after declining all interview opportunities. Allen’s telling of the story, entitled Mr. Pink: The Inside Story of the Transylvania Book Heist, was published under the pseudonym “Chas Allen” in 2010.

The film opens in select theatres on June 1! Click here to read a review from Variety.

Welcome to Archives & Special Collections, Molly!

Join us as we celebrate the arrival of Molly Campbell, the new Digital Archivist! I took a little time to interview our newest addition to the team to introduce her to Around the D.

Woman on a mountain trail wearing a white t-shirt and black sunglasses.

Molly Campbell

You’re just beginning to get to know Davidson’s Archives & Special Collections–what’s your background in archival work?

I first became interested in archives when I was an undergraduate student studying  public history at James Madison University. I was lucky enough at that time to acquire a summer internship at the Hagley Museum and Library in Wilmington, DE. Over the course of that summer I really fell in love with archives and decided to pursue a MA in History to further my knowledge of the field. Once I had obtained my MA from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst it was fairly apparent that I was also going to need a Master in Library Science (MLS) in order to better understand archives, so I did just that at the University of Maryland, College Park. After graduation I worked in the archives of The Lawrenceville School, which is a boarding school in Lawrenceville, NJ. At Lawrenceville I had the chance to work on a number of exciting projects, including working with students and faculty.

What about the Digital Archivist position interested you?

The position interested me for a number of reasons. I think initially the title “Digital Archivist” attracted me because I am particularly interested in working with and managing electronic records. Thanks to the proliferation of digital technology our society is producing a massive amount of data that archivists are trying to collect, organize, preserve, and make accessible. I want to be part of that movement to preserve digital records and this will be a fantastic opportunity to do just that. Davidson is currently producing a large amount of digital material and I hope that I can help collect that information so future students, faculty, and staff can easily access it. I am also excited to make our print and a/v collections more easily accessible through digitization initiatives.

Are there any projects you’re particularly passionate about introducing to Davidson?

I have a number of ideas relating to projects that I think would be exciting to introduce to Davidson, but for the time being I am going to try and better understand what this particular community values and how the Archives & Special Collections can better serve it. I would really like to take the time to learn how people currently utilize the materials in Archives & Special Collections to see what projects would best serve our userbase.

White sheet cake that reads "Welcome Molly"

A welcome party was held in the Library for Molly on Wednesday, April 4!

You haven’t been here long yet, but what has been your most memorable or surprising experience at Davidson thus far?

I was pleasantly surprised how welcoming everyone has been since I arrived. The most memorable experience thus far was when a group of the Library staff surprised me with a welcome song set to the tune of “Hello, Dolly.” It was great and certainly very memorable!

 

What are three things you want Davidson’s community to know about you?

More than anything else I would like the community to know that I am excited to be here and am ready to hit the ground running!  I am excited to begin meeting students, staff, and faculty across campus and would like to hear how they envision Archives & Special Collections best serving them. Please feel free to drop me a line anytime!

Reckless Driving Incident Sheds Light on Life and Service of Mr. Enoch Donaldson

 

Fallen gravestone on dead leaves.

Photograph of desecrated tombstone of Enoch Donaldson from earlier this month.

On Wednesday, March 7th a currently unidentified reckless driver speeding through Davidson at twice the posted speed limit was found to have damaged headstones at the Christian Aid Society Cemetery on Ridge Road. The Christian Aid Society was founded as a group of black churches in Davidson in 1905 and the cemetery was originally a designated resting place for Davidson’s black community. Although not owned by the college, the Christian Aid Society Cemetery can be found just beyond the baseball field.

A sepia-toned photograph of a black man in a vest and dress slacks standing in front of a columned building

Mr. Enoch Donaldson

Among those whose headstones were desecrated by the reckless driver was Mr. Enoch Donaldson, a man who served Davidson College for decades during the early to mid-twentieth century eventually becoming “Dean of Janitors.” Donaldson was born after the Emancipation Proclamation marked the start of the abolition of slavery. Although the exact date of Donaldson’s birth is unknown, he was born in 1867 according to his death certificate. He passed away at the age of approximately 95 on February 25, 1962.

Throughout Donaldson’s lifetime of service to Davidson College, the town and the institution examined and changed racist policies. According to the 1870 census, only 630 of the 1,605 residents of the town of Davidson were black. During his early childhood, in 1875, Davidson College students were granted the requests made in a petition to “keep out of the College all colored persons to whom express permissions had not been given to enter or labor there.” The only exceptions were those who attended church on campus and two men, Jim Burton and George Wilson, who were employed as laborers. Towards the end of his life, campus conversations regarding integration and civil rights became increasingly accepting of interracial connections. In the 1950s, Louis Armstrong performed at the college three times and Otis Redding visited once to perform in 1961.

In February 1961, a year prior to Donaldson’s death, the Board of Trustees voted to integrate the college, a decision which was poorly received by the majority of students and local residents. Unfortunately, Mr. Enoch Donaldson did not live to see the campus’ welcome to Ben Nzengu, the student who broke the color barrier, in the fall of 1962.

The life of Mr. Enoch Donaldson offers unique perspective and appreciation of the black slaves and laborers whose tireless, lifelong efforts built the foundation of Davidson College. Those curious to learn more about Mr. Donaldson’s life can read his story here: Born after Freedom.

Headstone reading: ENOCH DONALDSON  BORN AFTER FREEDOM  DIED FEBRUARY 25, 1962  AGE ABOUT 95 YEARS  FOR JUST UNDER A CENTURY, SON, FATHER, HUSBAND,CHURCH FATHER & FRIEND   ROMANS 5:3-4  ERECTED IN HONOR OF A LIFE LIVED

Headstone of Mr. Enoch Donaldson

The maintenance of the Christian Aid Society and its cemetery is integral to the preservation of the legacy of black existence and influence in the Davidson community. The Society is in need of contributions to aid restoration of the historic burial site. Those interested in contributing may write a check to the Christian Aid Society and mail it to Davidson Christian Aid Society, PO Box 1323, Davidson NC 28036.

Library Directors of the Past, Present, and Future: Welcome Lisa Forrest!

On July 1, Lisa Forrest of Hamilton College will become the second Leland M. Park Director of the Library and Davidson College’s fifth Library Director since its founding in 1837.

Portrait of a white business woman with short blonde hair in a gray blazer and purple blouse against a light blue background.

Lisa Forrest

Forrest’s career prior to Davidson includes service as the director of research and instructional design for Hamilton College’s Burke Library and as an associate librarian at SUNY Buffalo’s E.H. Butler Library.  Ms. Forrest has been honored with the Excellence in Library Service Award from the Western New York Library Resources Council and as a fellow of the EDUCAUSE Leading Change Institute.

As Davidson College and other elite institutions of higher learning explore the future of facilities built around books in the digital era, Forrest’s expertise in both traditional and experimental models of teaching, learning, and research in the liberal arts will be of great service.

Past Library Directors of Davidson College

Sketched portrait of a woman in early 1900s attire, reads: "MISS CORNELIA SHAW LIBRARIAN AND REGISTRAR A faithful friend and true advisor to every college man"

Cornelia Rebekah Shaw, 1907-1936.

The Library Director position was inaugurated by Cornelia Rebekah Shaw, who was elected “Librarian and Registrar at a salary of $900.00 per annum” on May 28, 1907. Shaw’s twenty-nine year career on campus was notable in many respects–she was the college’s first woman employee, first librarian, first registrar, and first secretary to the President. She was well respected by all on campus and her hospitable service to the library made her well-known as every student’s best friend. In fact, the college yearbook Quips and Cranks, was dedicated to Miss Shaw in 1912. During her time, Shaw oversaw the movement of the library’s collection of little more than 10,000 volumes from the “Union Library” room in Chambers  to the Carnegie Library, which has served as a guest house since 1942. Shaw’s history of the school, Davidson College, was published in 1923 with a foreword from College President Henry Louis Smith (1901-1912) and can be found in the Davidson College Special Collections.

Portrait of Chalmers Gaston Davidson smiling in from of a campus building, appears to be either Phi or Eu Halls. Black and white.

Chalmers Gaston Davidson, 1936-1975.

Following Miss Shaw’s retirement in 1936, Davidson College’s longest serving Library Director began service: Chalmers Gaston Davidson ’28. Affectionately known across campus as “Dr. D,” Davidson was the college’s first professional librarian, he earned his Master’s in Library Science from the University of Chicago in 1936. When Dr. D’s career began, the library was very small and not the hub of student life as it is known today. The collection was a mere 39,000 volumes, the annual materials budget was $3,500, and there was only one other employee: assistant librarian, Miss Julia Passmore. However, barring the years Dr. Henry Lilly took over the position whilst Davidson served in WWII, Davidson revolutionized the library space, including overseeing the move to the Grey Memorial Library in 1941. Not only was Davidson also a member of the college History department, but by 1961, he had grown the annual library budget to $41,000. Perhaps Dr. D’s success was in his blood, given that he was a direct descendant of William Lee Davidson, the college’s namesake.

Headshot of a laughing man wearing glasses, black and white.

Leland M. Park ’63, 1975-2006.

The 1974-1975 school year brought much change to the Davidson library: Dr. D retired, Leland M. Park ’63 became the new Library Director, and the E.H. Little Library was dedicated in September of 1974. Park earned his Library Sciences degrees from Emory University and Florida State University before serving as Library Director for 31 years. At his retirement in 2006, the Quips and Cranks yearbook staff elected to dedicate their volume to Park and his service to the school and the Library Director position was named in his honor.

Portrait of Gillian Gremmels. Woman with black glasses, wavy brown hair with bangs and a pink blouse against a black background.

Gillian “Jill” Gremmels, 2007-2017.

In 2007, Gillian Gremmels was named the first Leland M. Park Director of the Library. Unlike her predecessors, Gremmels was neither an alum of the college nor a long-time resident of the area. Gremmels was raised by two professors on the campus Iowa’s Wartburg College, is a descendant of Wartburg’s founder, and continued on to attend the school and act as their Library Director. Although currently on sabbatical from the mentoring seminar faculty of the Association of College and Research Libraries and after serving Davidson College for ten years, Jill Gremmels will serve the Dean of Cowles Library at Drake University in Des Moines, Iowa beginning on July 1.

SaveSave

SaveSave

Quips, Cranks, and Wanton Wiles: Origins of the College Yearbook’s Title

In yesterday’s issue of the campus newspaper, The Davidsonian, an article by Emma Brentjens ’21 profiled the two women behind the school’s yearbook–Quips and Cranks. Mariah Clarke ‘18 and Hayley Atkins ‘18 are currently co-Editors-in-Chief of the 123 year-old publication. The Quips and Cranks was founded in 1895 and, according to College Archivist DebbieLee Landi, the yearbook originally served as a creative outlet for students, becoming the second campus publication of student work and interests beyond the Davidson Monthly. Since 1895, Quips and Cranks has connected students, archivists and alumni with Davidson College’s past.

Cloth book cover. Colorblocked with one thick teal stripe on the left side, the rest is beige. "QUIPS AND CRANKS" is written in gold lettering.

Quips and Cranks 1895, volume I.

While most members of the Davidson community are more than familiar with the college yearbook, Quips and Cranks, they may be less familiar with the origins of its title.  

The title comes from a line of Milton’s poem L’Allegro as published in his 1645 anthology, Poems. The poem is a companion to another Milton piece, Il Penseroso. As Jennifer Hickey and Thomas H. Luxon of the John Milton Reading Room at Dartmouth College describe the pairing, “l’allegro is the “happy person who spends an idealized day in the country as a festive evening in the city, il penseroso is “the thoughtful person” whose night is filled with meditative walking in the woods and hours of study in a ‘lonely Towr’.” The poem puts at odds the sensations of mirth and melancholy through the perspectives of a man enjoying the wonders of nature in the countryside and vibrant city life.

Specifically, the yearbook title comes from this passage:

Haste thee nymph, and bring with thee

Jest and youthful Jollity,

Quips and cranks, and wanton wiles,

Nods, and becks, and wreathed smiles,

Such as hang on Hebe’s cheek,

And love to live in dimple sleek;

Sport that wrinkled Care derides,

And Laughter holding both his sides.

Here, Milton is idolizing the joys the nature brings to one who walks within it, such joys indeed are also brought to the students of Davidson College by one another. For those who seek to share some of that joy, digitized copies of the Quips and Cranks dating back to the 1895 edition and as recent as 2011 can be found on the Davidson College Archives & Special Collections website.

Matte silver book cover featuring shiny lowercase cursive writing reading "davidson" up the right side of the cover and the wildcat logo. "Quips and Cranks" is featuring on the lower left diagonal side of the logo.

Quips and Cranks 2017, volume CXIV.

The full version of L’Allegro can be found here.

The John Milton Reading Room article on L’Allegro can be found here.

The article from The Davidsonian can be founds here.

 

“The Total Package”: Advertising in Davidson’s Past and Present

Last month, Davidson College made headlines when Kiplinger’s 2018 Best College Values report revealed that it had been ranked as the liberal arts institution of the highest overall value in the country and the second best overall value in higher education, following Princeton University.

Davidson was lauded for its commitment to providing an education on par with large New England universities in a small town environment. Also noted were the College’s 10:1 student-to-faculty ratio, NCAA Division I athletics and financial aid packages devoid of loans thanks to the Davidson Trust. On offering generous financial packages, College President Carol Quillen says, “The no-loan program is our way of telling talented students of all financial backgrounds that we want them here and will do what we can to make it possible for them to attend.”

Looking back in Davidson’s history, College advertisements boasted the College’s curriculum geared toward Christian leadership, the connection to the Presbyterian Church, the outstanding faculty and available athletic facilities.

The College Archives & Special Collections features two newspaper advertisements for the College from the turn of the 20th century, unfortunately, their specific publication dates are unknown. Do you have any advertisements from Davidson’s history?

Newspaper advertisement describing school year and offerings, interested students should inquire with Registrar.

College advertisement, year unknown.

Newspaper advertisement describing course offerings and listing faculty.

College advertisement, year unknown.

Fate and the Future: Davidson’s First Programmer

A walk down memory lane on Davidson’s campus offered Chip Davis, a Davidson native and one of the first to use a computer on this campus, a unique opportunity to share his story.

A bespectacled boy of about 14 sits in a folding chair in front of the IBM 1620 computer circa 1963.

       A student working with the IBM 1620.

Chip Davis was born a year to the day that his father, William A. Davis (Class of 1950) graduated from Davidson College. His father went on to assume responsibility for the College Infirmary and growing up, Chip came to know many of the faculty as friends and neighbors.  Today, he is (mostly) retired from a career work with programmers on mainframe computer systems and then training future programs. He was first introduced to computer programming on Davidson’s campus during his teenage years.

Introducing digital technology to the Davidson curriculum

A portrait of a man in collegiate robes leans casually against his desk. His cap lies on the tabletop and he hold a bound leather book on his lap.

David Grier Martin served as the Davidson College Treasurer from 1951-1958 and as College President from 1958-1968.

In a memo to the faculty in October of 1962, College President David Grier Martin announced that the College would be renting an IBM 1620 computer on a trial basis. Davidson was going to throw its hat in the ring with a first attempt to use computers for educational and research purposes.In 1962, Dr. Locke taught an hour-long non-credit programming course. In the following years, only a few classes used the computer at all: Psychology 71: Advanced Experimental Psychology in 1963 and Applied Math 11: Introduction to Digital Computers in  1964.

Chip Davis on cutting-edge technology on Davidson’s campus in the 1960s

“One day in the winter of 1963, Dr. Bryan took me down to see the freshly installed computer in Chambers. It consisted of the 1620 Central Processing Unity and the 1622 Card Reader/Punch. The 1311 Disk Drive would come later, which meant that there was no file system on which to store programs, so you punched out a deck of cards instead.

I wrote quite a few utility routines in machine language in those early days, mostly to make things easier for the ‘real’ programmers: professors and students who were using FORTRAN to solve problems in math or physics.

An IBM 1620 Computer from the early 1960s sits atop a table. A locked shelf is in the background

The IBM 1620 Computer.

Not everything I wrote for the 1620 was serious. One program created and printed out an image of the Jolly Green Giant to give to one of my favorite teachers.

Dr. Bryan and I found a program that would play music through an AM radio, tuned off-station, on the console.  The program created programming loops that matched the frequencies of a diatonic scale. We created one that played one of his favorite harpsichord melodies, and attempted to enhanced the program to make it polyphonic. The 1620 couldn’t do it, but it sparked an interest in Fourier transforms that came in handy when I worked on an analog/digital hybrid computer in college.”

The future of tech on Davidson’s campus

Spaces for technological innovation and exploration like Chip Davis’ exists still on this campus. Studio M offers students a center to learn the new cutting edge technologies, such as 3-D printing and laser cutting. Additionally, in 2017, the Hub@Davidson was created to foster a community around technology, innovation and entrepreneurship in the Lake Norman area.

Hidden History: Writing and Watermarks–John Rennie Blake

Between 1871 and 1877, Davidson College was without a president. The College was not, however, lacking in leadership. Following President George Wilson McPhail’s death in 1871, the Board of Trustees decided to replace the role of president with a chairman. The new role was assumed by Professor John Rennie Blake (1825-1900) from Greenwood, South Carolina. Professor Blake was educated at the University of Georgia and Harvard University’s Lawrence Scientific School. Prior to his election as a professor of Natural Philosophy in 1861, Professor Blake also served as an educator at the Presbyterian Female School in  Georgia and LaGrange Synodical College in Tennessee. Although governing a college during post-civil war reconstruction was no easy feat, Davidson produced two notable alumni under Professor Blake: Woodrow Wilson (attending from 1873-1874) and Robert Broadnax Glenn (class of 1875) who went on to be the first Davidson alum elected governor of North Carolina. Unfortunately for Professor Blake, the Board of Trustees moved to reinstate the office of the president to the college in 1877 and, not being ordained by the Presbyterian Church, Blake was ineligible for presidency. However, he remained on campus acting as the College’s Vice-President and teaching astronomy and natural philosophy courses until resigning in 1885.

The Davidson College Archives holds a document by Professor Blake with a remarkably clear watermark and a reflection on the importance of classic poetry, transcribed below. Favorite Watermark.png

The Poet – John Rennie Blake (date unknown)

We would fain survey the unfading laurels won by the Poets tunefull [sic] hands. And who merites [sic] more the praise and love of man? They enhance the glories of worthy, and the depravities of the aricious [sic]. They beat the strains gentle yet startling which the wourld [sic] hears and bending listens with alternate ebbs and flows of soul as glory, or crime is the burden of the song. He may not now—as once—like the schrill [sic] tones of the clarion call to battle but he can breath a melody that will come upon the troubled heart “like an angel’s whisper.” We “brings fresh showers to the fainting flowers.” The stern realities of life melt by the soft touch of his magic wound with his sweets that sink into the inmost heart. He creates “pure fountains of thought” whose cooling waters “change the barren desert of the heart into a green oasis, as reviving to the troubled soul, as the breath to the fevered brow. The tears of bitterness, the sighs of woe—the greifs [sic] an cares that embitter the young heart—die silently away before the magic influence of the poet. Who can tell the genial flow of soul, the fervent gushings of feeling, and the divings of thought into thoughs [sic] boundless sea to bring to light some “precious pearl of truth,” that have been incited by such gifted minds, and eloquent tongues. What patriot amid the general rejoicings and the glory of his country does not see that glory enhanced and illuminated by the shining literary lights that start its skies. Supose [sic] that the sacred scroll bearing the gilded, and emblazoning names of Shakespeare, Milton, Biron [sic], and many others, should be cast into the fountain of oblivion. Is that would then harmonize the discordant elements that would then rime [sic] throughout Old Europe. Around what human after could mankind then bow in common and mutual veneration But thanks to the age those names can never perish. What lights in the distance “which lends an enhancement to the view” would then shine upon the path of the solitary scholar to pilot him to the temple of fame. The influence of the tryumphs [sic] of poetry are coexistent with time. In conclusion I will give an example of genuine poetry which cannot fail to touch the coldest heart.  

Jack and Bill went up the hill 

After a bucket of water 

Jack fell down and broke his crown 

And Bill came tumbling after